Answer : C

Solution :

We have to find the multiples of 4 between 432 and 4200. (excluding 432 and 4200).
First number that is divisible by 4 from 432 is 436.
And the last number that is divisible by 4 is 4196.
Therefore, we have to find the number of terms in the series 436, 440,…,4196.
This is an A.P. in which first term = a = 436, common difference = d = 4 and the last term = l = 4196.

The formula for the n-th term of an A.P. is given by tn = a + (n-1)d
Let, tn = l = 4196; then it is enough to find n.
a + (n-1) d = 4196
436 + (n-1) 4 = 4196
(n-1) 4 = 3760
(n-1) = 940.
n = 941.
Hence, the number of natural numbers between 432 and 4200 is 941.

Answer : A

Solution :

Average age of 25 children = 12.5
Sum of the age of 25 children = 12.5 x 25
The age of two of them are 8 and 10.
Sum of remaining 23 children = (12.5 x 25) – (8 + 10) = 312.5 – 18 = 294.5
And their average age = 294.5/23 = 12.8

Answer : C

Solution :

Let X be the first number of the multiplication and Y be the second one.
By observing, we can conclude that questions are in the general form X * Y = X+Y / 2 .
That is,
27 x 7 = 27+7 / 2 = 17
37 x 9 = 37+9 / 2 = 23
47 x 11 = 47+11 / 2 = 29
57 x 13 = 57+13 / 2 =70/2 = 35.
Hence, the answer is 35.

Answer : D

Solution :

2x+3y+4z=15

3x+2y+z=10

adding

5x+5y+5z=25

x+y+z=5 that is for 1 orange, 1 bannana and 1 apple requires 5Rs.

so for 3 orange, 3 bannana and 3 apple requires 15Rs.

i.e. 3x+3y+3z=15

Answer : 26

Solution :

These kinds of questions are always recurring across placement papers of different companies. In this case the sequence closely resembles the series 1,4,9,25,36 with 1 being added to each of the elements. Hence the missing number would be 25 + 1 = 26.

Answer : B

Solution :

Given that, the speed in still water = 5 km/hr
Let the speed of the stream be X km/hr.
Then speed in downstream = (5+X) km/hr
And, speed in upstream = (5-X) km/hr

The time taken to cover 13 km downstream = 13/(5+X)
The time taken to cover 7 km upstream = 7/(5-X)

Therefore, 13/(5+X) = 7/(5-X)
13(5-X) = 7(5-X)
65 – 13X = 35+7X
30 = 20X
X = 30/20 = 3/2

Hence the required answer is 3/2 km/hr.

Answer : A

Solution :

Marked price of the bike = Rs.65000
Discount on marked price = 3%

Then the selling price (S.P) of the bike = 97% of Rs.65000
ie., S.P = 97/100 x 65000 = Rs.(97 x 650) = Rs.63050

The sales man made a profit of 30%.
i.e., if the S.P is Rs.130 then its C.P = Rs.100
Therefore the C.P of the bike = Rs. 100/130 x 63050 = Rs.(100×485) = Rs.48500
Hence the required answer is Rs.48500.

Answer : C

Solution :

Given that the bill amount = Rs.1904
Actual share of each = Rs.1904/8 = Rs.238
If one of 8 is left, then the sharing amount = Rs.1904/7 = Rs.272
Then the extra amount given by each = Rs.(272 – 238) = Rs.34.
Hence the answer is Rs.34

Answer : D

Solution :

We know that, the unit’s digit of a perfect square cannot be 2, 3, 7 or 8.
Since the number 95478 end with 8, discard it.

And, we know that, “A number has even powers of its prime factors if and only if it is a perfect square”.

Make prime factorization of the given numbers as follows:

63504 = 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 3 x 3 x 3 x 3 x 7 x 7 = 24 x 34 x 72
i.e., the prime factors are 2, 3, 7 and their powers are even numbers.
Therefore, 63504 is a perfect square.

72326 = 2 x 36163 = 2 x odd, so, 2 in 72326 has an odd power, which means that 72326 is not a perfect square.

70956 = 4 x 9 x 9 x 3 x 73 = 22 x 35 x 73, so, 3 in 70956 has an odd power, which means that 70956 is not a perfect square.

Hence, only 63504 is a perfect square.

Answer : C

Solution :

Dimension of the room = 30m x 24m
Length and breadth of the room are 30m and 24m respectively.
Area of the floor = 30 x 24 = 720 m2.
Twice of the area of the floor = 720 x 2 = 1440 m2…..(1)

Let h be the height of the room.
Then, length of the wall = h m.
And, the breadth of the 4 walls = 30m, 24m, 30m and 24m respectively.

Area of the two opposite walls with breadth 30 m and height h m = 2(30h) m2
Area of the other two opposite walls with breadth 24 m and height h m = 2(24h) m2
Sum of the areas of four walls = 2(30h) + 2(24h) = 2h(30 + 24) = 108h m2….(2)

Given that, (1) and (2) are equal, then we have,
1440 = 108h
h = 1440/108 = 40/3 m.

Required volume of the room = l x b x h = 30 x 24 x 40/3 = 9600 m3.
Hence the answer is 9600 m3.

Answer : B

Solution :

Given that, the speed and length of two trains are equal.
And, they are moving in the opposite direction, they take 25 seconds to cross each other.

Let the required speed of the trains be X m/sec.
Now, from the formula (a + b)/(u + v), we have a = b = 250 m and u = v = X m/sec.

Then, a + b = 250 + 250 = 500 m and u + v = 2X m/sec.
25 = 500/2X sec.
X = 10 m/sec = 10 x 18/5 km/hr = 36 km/hr.
Hence, the speed of two trains is 36 km/hr.

Answer : A

Solution :

Given that, sqrt(1.44) % of sqrt(23.04) % of 1.5 % of 3125 = sqrt(?)% of 2.5920

Note that, sqrt(1.44) = 1.2 and sqrt(23.04) = 4.8

Put the above values in the given eqn,

1.2 % of 4.8 % of 1.5 % of 3125 = sqrt(?)% of 2.5920

1.2/100 x 4.8/100 x 1.5/100 x 3125 = sqrt(?)/100 x 2.5920

Convert decimal numbers into fractions,

12/1000 x 48/1000 x 15/1000 x 3125 = sqrt(?)/100 x 25920/10000

Cancel out the possible denominators on both sides,

12 x 48 x 15/1000 x 3125 = sqrt(?) x 25920

12 x 48 x 15 x 25 x 1/8 = sqrt(?) x 25920

15 x 25x 1/8 = sqrt(?)x 45

25/24 = sqrt(?)

? = (25/24)2 = 625/576.

 

Answer : C

Solution :

Ratio of their radius is 1:2.
Let r and 2r be their radius.

Ratio of their heights is 1:3 .
Let h and 3h be their respective heights.

Therefore, their respective volumes
(1/3) (pi) (r2) h ….(1)
(1/3) (pi) (2r)2 (3h) …..(2)

Divide 1 by 2, we have
(1/3) (pi) (r2) h / (1/3) (pi) (2r)2 (3h)
= 1/12
Hence the required ratio is 1:12.

Answer : B

Solution :

Given that, 48.4% of 9500 = 10100 – 5% of 10100 – X
X = 10100 – 5% of 10100 – 48.4% of 9500
X = 10100 – 5×10100/100 – 48.4×9500/100
X = 10100 – 5×101 – 48.4×95
X = 10100 – 505 – 4598 = 4997.

Answer : A

Solution :

The numbers in the given series are obtained as follows:

1st number: 13

2nd number: 1st x 1.5 = 13 x 1.5 = 19.5
3rd number: 2nd x 2 = 19.5 x 2 = 39
4th number: 3rd x 2.5 = 39 x 2.5 = 97.5
5th number: 4th x 3 = 97.5 x 3 = 292.5
6th number: 5th x 3.5 = 292.5 x 3.5 = 1023.75 (note that, there is 1028 instead of 1023.75).

Hence, the required wrong number is 1028.

Answer : A

Solution :

Let the cost of kg of rice, wheat and pulses be Rs.X, Rs.Y and Rs.Z respectively.
We have to find the difference of cost of wheat and pulses; i.e., X – Z.
Average cost of rice and wheat = Rs.(X+Y) / 2
Average cost of wheat and pulses = Rs.(Y+Z) / 2
Given that, Rs.(X+Y) / 2 – Rs.(Z+Y) / 2 = Rs.30
(X + Y) – (Z + Y) = Rs.60
(X – Z) = 60.
Hence, the answer is Rs.60.

Answer : C

Solution :

The numbers of the given series are obtained as follows :

5th number = 6th number x 2 + 1 = 40 x 2 + 1 = 81
4th number = 5th number x 2 + 2 = 81 x 2 + 2 = 164
3rd number = 4th number x 2 + 3 = 164 x 2 + 3 = 331
2nd number = 3rd number x 2 + 4 = 331 x 2 + 4 = 666 (there is 662 instead of 666).
1st number = 2nd number x 2 + 5 = 666 x 2 + 5 = 1337.
Therefore, 2nd number 662 is the wrong number.

Answer : C

Solution :

Product of HCF and LCM = product of the numbers
Then, product of the numbers = 19 x 1140
Let 19a and 19b be the numbers.
19a x 19b = 19 x 1140
ab = 19 x 1140 / 19 x 19 = 60

If ab = 60 then (a,b) = (1,60), (2,30), (3,20), (4,15), (5,12) and (6,10).
Since a and b are co-primes then (a,b) = (1,60), (4,15) and (5,12)
Hence the number of such pairs = 3a

Answer : A

Solution :

The LCM of given dividends 7, 10, 16 and 28 is 560.
i.e., lowest number which divisible by 7, 10, 16 and 28 is 560.
Then the lowest number which leaves 6 when divided by 7, 10, 16 and 28 is 560 + 6
Therefore the lowest multiple of 6, leaving 6 as remainder when divided by 7, 10, 16 and 28 is 560k + 6

Now, we have to find for which value of k, 560k + 6 will be a multiple of 6 by substituting k = 1, 2, 3 and so on.
If k = 1, 560k + 6 = 560 + 6 = 566 which is not a multiple of 6
If k = 2, 560k + 6 = 1120 + 6 = 1126 which is not a multiple of 6
If k = 3, 560k + 6 = 1680 + 6 = 1686 which is a multiple of 6.
Hence the required least number is 1686.

MARK HUGHES is a master of the fine art of survival. His Los Angeles-based Herbalife International Inc. is a pyramid outfit that peddles weight-loss and nutrition concoctions of dubious value. Bad publicity and regulatory crackdowns hurt his U.S. business in the late 1980s. But Hughes, 41, continues to enjoy a luxurious lifestyle in a $20 million Beverly Hills mansion. He has been sharing the pad and a yacht with his third wife, a former Miss Petite U.S.A. He can finance this lavish lifestyle just on his salary and bonus, which last year came to $7.3 million.

He survived his troubles in the U.S. by moving overseas, where regulators are less zealous and consumers even more naive, at least initially. Today 77% of Herbalife retail sales derive from overseas. Its new prowling grounds: Asia and Russia. Last year Herbalife’s net earnings doubled, to $45 million, on net sales of $632 million. Based on Herbalife’s Nasdaq-traded stock, the company has a market capitalization of $790 million, making Hughes 58% worth $454 million.

There’s a worm, though, in Hughes apple. Foreigners aren’t stupid. In the end they know when they’ve been had. In France, for instance, retail sales rose to $97 million by 1993 and then plunged to $12 million last year. In Germany sales hit $159 million in 1994 and have since dropped to $54 million.

Perhaps aware that the world may not provide an infinite supply of suckers, Hughes wanted to unload some of his shares. But in March, after Herbalife’s stock collapsed, he put off a plan to dump about a third of his holdings on the public.

Contributing to Hughes’ woes, Herbalife’s chief counsel and legal attack dog, David Addis, quit in January. Before packing up, he reportedly bellowed at Hughes, “I can’t protect you anymore.” Addis, who says he wants to spend more time with his family, chuckles and claims attorney-client privilege.

Trouble on the home front, too. On a recent conference call with distributors, Hughes revealed he’s divorcing his wife, Suzan, whose beaming and perky image adorns much of Herbalife’s literature.

Meanwhile, in a lawsuit that’s been quietly moving through Arizona’s Superior Court, former Herbalife distributor Daniel Fallow of Sandpoint, Idaho charges that Herbalife arbitrarily withholds payment to distributors and marks up its products over seven times the cost of manufacturing. Fallow also claims Hughes wanted to use the Russian mafia to gain entry to that nation’s market.

Fallow himself is no angel, but his lawsuit, which was posted on the Internet, brought out other complaints. Randy Cox of Lewiston, Idaho says Herbalife “destroyed my business” after he and his wife complained to the company that they were being cheated out of their money by higher-ups in the pyramid organization.

Will Hughes survive again? Don’t count on it this time.

MARK HUGHES is a master of the fine art of survival. His Los Angeles-based Herbalife International Inc. is a pyramid outfit that peddles weight-loss and nutrition concoctions of dubious value. Bad publicity and regulatory crackdowns hurt his U.S. business in the late 1980s. But Hughes, 41, continues to enjoy a luxurious lifestyle in a $20 million Beverly Hills mansion. He has been sharing the pad and a yacht with his third wife, a former Miss Petite U.S.A. He can finance this lavish lifestyle just on his salary and bonus, which last year came to $7.3 million.

He survived his troubles in the U.S. by moving overseas, where regulators are less zealous and consumers even more naive, at least initially. Today 77% of Herbalife retail sales derive from overseas. Its new prowling grounds: Asia and Russia. Last year Herbalife’s net earnings doubled, to $45 million, on net sales of $632 million. Based on Herbalife’s Nasdaq-traded stock, the company has a market capitalization of $790 million, making Hughes 58% worth $454 million.

There’s a worm, though, in Hughes apple. Foreigners aren’t stupid. In the end they know when they’ve been had. In France, for instance, retail sales rose to $97 million by 1993 and then plunged to $12 million last year. In Germany sales hit $159 million in 1994 and have since dropped to $54 million.

Perhaps aware that the world may not provide an infinite supply of suckers, Hughes wanted to unload some of his shares. But in March, after Herbalife’s stock collapsed, he put off a plan to dump about a third of his holdings on the public.

Contributing to Hughes’ woes, Herbalife’s chief counsel and legal attack dog, David Addis, quit in January. Before packing up, he reportedly bellowed at Hughes, “I can’t protect you anymore.” Addis, who says he wants to spend more time with his family, chuckles and claims attorney-client privilege.

Trouble on the home front, too. On a recent conference call with distributors, Hughes revealed he’s divorcing his wife, Suzan, whose beaming and perky image adorns much of Herbalife’s literature.

Meanwhile, in a lawsuit that’s been quietly moving through Arizona’s Superior Court, former Herbalife distributor Daniel Fallow of Sandpoint, Idaho charges that Herbalife arbitrarily withholds payment to distributors and marks up its products over seven times the cost of manufacturing. Fallow also claims Hughes wanted to use the Russian mafia to gain entry to that nation’s market.

Fallow himself is no angel, but his lawsuit, which was posted on the Internet, brought out other complaints. Randy Cox of Lewiston, Idaho says Herbalife “destroyed my business” after he and his wife complained to the company that they were being cheated out of their money by higher-ups in the pyramid organization.

Will Hughes survive again? Don’t count on it this time.